Drug kingpin?

Green Bay Packers’ defensive end Johnny Jolly’s trial for felony drug possession is set to begin on Friday and it has been previously speculated that if convicted, Jolly would likely receive probation as a first-time offender.

Today, it was revealed that the stakes are a lot higher. Per Greg Bedard, the prosecution intends to present evidence that Jolly was an active participant in the drug trade on a substantial scale. Assistant Harris County District Attorney Todd Keagle intends to “use extraneous offenses and prior convictions for impeachment and/or punishment.”

Among those alleged extraneous offenses: That Jolly “bought, sold, funded, transported and aided in the buying, selling, funding and transportation of illegal narcotics including cocaine and marijuana” in Harris County from 2006 through May 2008.

The prosecutor also intends to introduce evidence that during the same period, Jolly was seen smoking marijuana and consuming liquid codeine; that Jolly “showed deception” during a polygraph test this month when asked about his use of alcohol, marijuana and street narcotics while on bond since December 15; and that he has attended nightclubs and bars and consumed alcohol since December, in violation of his bond.

We’ve all heard about the latter set of allegations, but the first set involves some serious shit — federal-pound-me-in-the-ass-prison-type shit.

And there’s more.

According to a source close to the investigation, a witness has come forward who will testify that Jolly not only funded drug transactions, but was present at the time of the dealings and used many of eight cars to carry the drugs in multiple transactions.

The caveat is this evidence cannot be introduced if Jolly is found not guilty or if he agrees to a plea deal. It can only be used if Jolly is found guilty, at which time the prosecution would present it to the jury to determine the length of his sentence.

At this point, it’s important to remember Jolly hasn’t been convicted of anything, except being a dumbass, and that’s the point his attorney made on Wednesday.

Michelle E. Beck, Jolly’s defense attorney, said that the document includes only “vague allegations” and that the fact that prosecutors filed it does not prove anything. She said Jolly has never previously been convicted on any crime.

“I could file a notice of intent to prove I’m Santa Claus, but that doesn’t mean it’s true,” she said.

“We dispute (the allegations), and we look forward to having our day in court,” she said.

If Jolly is convicted and the jury believes the evidence as Keagle has set forth, he’s likely to face a lot more than probation and a lot more than the 21 months Michael Vick served for strangling dogs. He’s also unlikely to see an NFL football field again, unless it’s as a spectator.

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